One day, nine stories: Luzia and Denise in Canada

One day, nine stories: Luzia and Denise in Canada

Luzia and Denise love the occasional jump out of their comfort zones and into big adventures. Literally as well as figuratively. They travel through Canada by bike and car, meeting all kinds of people. This is their second real big travel and the first one together on a bike. We’ve met them in Dawson City, Yukon, Canada, and cycled 780 Kilometers from there across the Arctic Circle into Inuvik together. That’s how we learned that these two power-women never give up, no matter how bumpy the road, how strong the headwind or how steep the climbs.

Denise and Luzia write more than just a blog, it’s much rather a collection of impressions, brilliant articles on culture and people, as well as a personal journal. It’s written in German and you can check it out here:

Luzia’s and Denise’s awesome bicycle adventures

Enjoy Luzia’s and Denise’s September 5th 2015 in Canada!

0.00h: A voice announcing the ferry arrival in 45 minutes wakes us up. We were sleeping outside on deck 6 of the ferry from Haines, Alaska to Prince Rupert, Canada. The night before, we could watch the dancing northern lights in the sky from our improvised bed. Midnight is not a good time starting the day. But we’ll have to leave the ferry.

0.45h: The ferry arrives in Prince Rupert. Feeling dead tired we pack the bicycles and ride out of the ferry. Waiting in the line to cross the border to Canada I realize that we have to turn the clock one hour ahead. That means one hour less sleep on top of that screwed up night.

2.15h: The officer at the customs is very friendly even though he has to do the nightshift. With a new stamp in our passports we cycle to the campground. We are happy that we only have the ride 1,5 km in the darkness.

2.30h: After checking in (the Chinese owners are still awake to collect the money) we put the tent inside the kitchen shelter. The friendly owner gave us this advice as the forecast announced rain for the next morning. And I hate packing a wet tent.

3.00h: Finally we say good night for the second time and set the alarm. There will be another ferry to catch on an island in the Pacific ocean called Haida Gwaii in a few hours.

8.15h: Far too early we got waken up by Denises phone. It’s raining and I am so happy that we can put a dry tent down. A quick wash in the washroom later we load the bikes again and cycle back to the ferry terminal. It’s pouring down now.

9.00h: The trip to Haida Gwaii will take 7 hours. I love taking ferries with the bike: no need to box the bicycle. In BC they charge only 5$ per bike. On the ferry you just park the bike on the vehicle deck. We always only take our valuables out of the bags and leave everything else on the bikes. Canada is a very safe country to travel.

10.00h: The ferry leaves the harbor to sail across 2m waves. It’s only a bit rough today not too bad but we can really feel the boat moving and I hope our bikes won’t fall over. “I need a coffee now!” Denise says. We brought some muesli and fruits aboard and can finally start that Saturday with the desperately needed shot of caffeine at 10.15h.

11.00h: We move over to the lounge where they show the Chronicles of Narnia on TV. But I’d rather sleep on the hard floor with a chilly breeze of the air-condition until we have lunch again. In the meantime the car deck is open for a few minutes and I go down to grab my sleeping bag from my bike. That’s much better for napping!

14.00h: Lunchtime. We smuggled some tortillas, cheese, lettuce and hummus over the border because we knew the cafeteria onboard would only cater the usual North American fast food (burger, fries, fish and chips) or overpriced salads. Nobody really cares that we eat our own food. It should be ok.

14.45h: I take another nap while Denise is reading a book.

17.00h: We arrive on Haida Gwaii and have to wait before all the cars have left the vessel. Cyclists count as foot passengers over here. Riding the bike is not allowed on BC ferries so we push our load to the terminal. Here we get picked up from Claudette, our wwoofing host. Our bikes fit perfectly on the pickup-truck. We will stay and help on her and her wife’s farm for the next 4 weeks. In exchange we get very good food and a cozy room. Wwoofing is a way to experience a country from the perspective of people actually living there. You don’t feel so much as a tourist anymore a get to know other places the locals go to.

18.30h:  Donna prepared delicious fish patties made of fresh caught salmon. We get a salad from their garden together with rice. We will need that energy as the first quest the next morning will be cleaning the stinky chicken’s house.

21.00h: We help preparing a yummy peach yam. I am already looking forward to try that for breakfast.

23.00h: A long day is over. We are dead tired and fall asleep listening the rolling waves of the ocean in our backyard.

Even though we had only been cycling 3 km that day: travelling by bike takes a lot of energy but is in the same time so exciting and rewarding.

 

One day, nine stories is about empathizing with other travel cyclists: here’s the other eight stories!

Rachel and Patrick from the USA who follow the rather bumpy Congo Nile Trail in Rwanda: One day, nine stories: Rachel and Patrick in Rwanda

Heike from Germany who cycles through Japan and decides half way through to rather have a sick day: One day, nine stories: Heike in Japan

Baerbel and Johan from Germany and the Netherlands who biked along the Pamir Highway in Tajikistan bordering Afghanistan: One day, nine stories: Baerbel and Johan in Tajikistan

Astrid from Austria who enjoyed a rest day with new friends in Uruguay: One day, nine stories: Astrid in Uruguay

Claudia and Peter from Austria who spent their September 5th in British Columbia, Canada: One day, nine stories: Claudia and Peter in Canada

Gerd from Germany who is on his way around Australia: One day, nine stories: Gerd in Australia

Lisi and Torsten from Germany who biked through the harsh Australian sun: One day, nine stories: Lisi and Tosten in Australia

Annika and Roberto from Germany and Mexico who are biking through Canada: One day, nine stories: Annika and Roberto in Canada

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